Samsung Continues to Poke Fun at Apple Fans in Super Bowl Ad

A nice post from MacRumors points out that Samsung continues to poke fun at Apple users, who stand in line to get the a newly launched product.

Now, as a dutch person, I am blissfully oblivious to the Super Bowl, but one thing I do know is:

Super Bowl ads do not come cheap

So, Samsung thinks people are wrong for being dedicated to a certain brand other then theirs (Apple, no surprises so far). And wants to use advertising to ‘convert’ such people to purchasing the ‘right’ choice. (their product). Nothing shocking so far.

So, they have spent millions ( from what I’ve learned, Super Bowl Ads really do not come cheap) on an ad, in which they alienate their prospective customers, by – basically – calling them idiots. Now, I am not one to complain when a big corporation pisses away it’s money. But seriously. Did you even pay attention in marketing school? Never, ever, ever, piss of people you want as your customer.

For people who buy Apple stuff, your products are probably just not interesting enough. From my own personal experience with Samsung: apple hardware is a hell of a lot better quality. If I spend money, I don’t mind spending more money, if I get a better product. Apple delivers. Every damn time.

Not that I would personally stand in line for it.

The only thing the iPad might be lacking

I, like many others, like the iPad. I don’t own one, and never have, because as much as I love my iPhone, I don’t like one simple thing:

– it’s got no separation for users

Separation for users, while a common thing on computers, including OS X, is very uncommon on phones and tablets. On phones like the iPhone this is entirely justifiable because phones in general have only one intended user. It’s a PIM, or personal information device. Computers are very much the opposite, where more then one users frequently accesses the same computer both in a work or a home setting.

Enter the tablet. The tablet seems to fit right between those two groups, but one thing is for sure: a tablet is often shared amongst people in a household.

Now comes the issue of user separation: my girlfriend and I both have email accounts, Facebook and twitter accounts, etc, that we would like to access on a tablet we would share. We also both have iPhone’s and Mac’s. But neither of us has any interest or business in the other’s email or Facebook, and the mentioned apps are not build to support more then one user for the most part, anyway.

Now, one might argue that we could just choose not to use email, Facebook, twitter, and what not, on the tablet, and this is possible. However, how much sense does it make to purchase a device for about € 499, and then be utterly limited in it’s use? And no, buying two would simply be wasteful.

So, one seemingly innocent feature, would probably open up a whole new piece of the market. I know it would for us. I imagine tablet manufacturers would much rather sell everyone in the household his or her own tablet. But in cases like this it’s not about making the most money, but just doing what’s right. You’re probably not going to loose sales over it. Some households will still buy more then one tablet, simply because the demand is high enough to justify such a purchase.

Crouching lion, hidden UNIX

One of the many things I like about Mac OS X (Server) is the fact it’s a pure-bred UNIX. It’s even certified as such. Not to mention that the Director of Unix Technology at Apple is the person who at one point started the FreeBSD project: Jordan K. Hubbard. (I love FreeBSD, so I’m very appreciative of Jordan’s work)

Another reason I like OS X as much as I do, is because literally anything can be done from the command-line, something a Unix nerd like myself thoroughly loves to do. But, OS X has advanced features like Access Control Lists and all that fancy stuff, so sometimes I can be a bit of a learn to find out how exactly OS X does things compared to other members of the Unix family.

Now, I mentioned ACL’s, when you do something rather simple like ‘ls -la on /Groups’, you get this:

server:Groups username$ ls -la
total 0
drwxr-xr-x+  6 root  wheel   204 Aug  7 21:57 .
drwxr-xr-x  33 root  wheel  1190 Aug 17 09:29 ..
-rwxr-xr-x   1 root  wheel     0 Jul 27 21:29 .localized
drwxrwx---+  5 root  admin   170 Aug 13 12:37 group1
drwxrwx---+  2 root  admin    68 Aug  7 21:57 group2
drwxrwx---+  2 root  admin    68 Jul 27 21:47 workgroup

which is nice enough, but what if I wanted to see the real permissions, including the ACL’s? There’s a switch for that:

ls -lae

Wich produces the following output:

total 0
drwxr-xr-x+  6 root  wheel   204 Aug  7 21:57 .
 0: user:_spotlight inherited allow list,search,file_inherit,directory_inherit
drwxr-xr-x  33 root  wheel  1190 Aug 17 09:29 ..
-rwxr-xr-x   1 root  wheel     0 Jul 27 21:29 .localized
drwxrwx---+  5 root  admin   170 Aug 13 12:37 group1
 0: group:group1 allow list,add_file,search,delete,add_subdirectory,delete_child,readattr,writeattr,readextattr,writeextattr,readsecurity,writesecurity,chown,file_inherit,directory_inherit
 1: user:_spotlight inherited allow list,search,file_inherit,directory_inherit
drwxrwx---+  2 root  admin    68 Aug  7 21:57 group2
 0: group:group2 allow list,add_file,search,delete,add_subdirectory,delete_child,readattr,writeattr,readextattr,writeextattr,readsecurity,writesecurity,chown,file_inherit,directory_inherit
 1: user:_spotlight inherited allow list,search,file_inherit,directory_inherit
drwxrwx---+  2 root  admin    68 Jul 27 21:47 workgroup
 0: 839AE424-BBF3-442E-BAD6-C8B5E8B596F5 allow list,add_file,search,delete,add_subdirectory,delete_child,readattr,writeattr,readextattr,writeextattr,readsecurity,writesecurity,chown,file_inherit,directory_inherit
 1: user:_spotlight inherited allow list,search,file_inherit,directory_inherit

It might be a bit daunting to read through, but heck if it does’t show you exactly what you need to see. It’s really easy seeing ACL’s on Mac OS X with ls!

In case you’re wondering, the ‘839AE424-BBF3-442E-BAD6-C8B5E8B596F5’ part corresponds to a UserID in OpenDirectory/LDAP.

Apple videostore stupidity

I don’t get Apple.

Apple TV
Apple TV

They make great products, have a great iTunes store, and make sure their products work with iTunes. Sounds pretty good, even if you are terrified of something called ‘vendor lock-in’. (which I am not)

Okay, so now we have something called: “Apple TV”. It breaks every rule of intelligent commerce and marketing in the Apple book. It’s useless. So, okay… you get to listen to your iTunes tracks, and watch your iPhoto pictures, and even youtube on your HD tv, through the Apple TV.

BUT!

it’s most important feature is shamelessly missing: video rental/purchase.

At least, when you live in The Netherlands, like I do.

When iTunes 8 was launched, it heralded iTunes’ wonderful feature to rent and purchase HD movies. But once again, this feature, with enormous amounts of my fellow Apple Mac / iPhone / iTunes users (and potential, if not current, Apple TV buyers/users) waiting for it,  is lacking in this country. EVERYONE I’ve spoken who uses iTunes (quite a lot I might add) have stated this is THE feature they are literally dying for.

Apple, where art thou Apple?

Update: since this post apple has released the Apple TV2 and it’s full-HD successor, and the video store in The Netherlands.